Sheridan Neighborhood Organization

SHERIDAN NEIGHBORHOOD NRP PLAN PART ONE

SHERIDAN

A Neighborhood Profile

 

Sheridan neighborhood, home of the historic Grain Belt Brewery, is the gateway to Northeast Minneapolis. It is bordered by 17th Avenue to the North; Washington Street to the East; Broadway Avenue to the South; and the mighty Mississippi River to the West. Originally the entry point for thousands of Eastern and Southern European immigrants, Sheridan continues to be seen as a shelter for those seeking a better life.

 

Although Northeast Minneapolis is viewed by many as a stable, ethnic, working-class area, within it lies Sheridan, a neighborhood in transition. According to the 1990 census, it was reported that 2,752 people lived in 1,268 households, but these demographics have changed dramatically in the past ten years. The percentage of people of color has tripled, 47.9 % of households have children under the age of eighteen (of which 44% are school-aged), and 55% are single parent homes. The rate of families living below the poverty level in Sheridan has increased to an alarming level (22.6%). Sheridan's median income is $20,225 compared to $32,998 citywide.

  

Due to the increase in our population, coupled with the deterioration of our housing stock, Sheridan has become prey to the effects of problem housing. With 80% of our housing stock built prior to 1920, the rate of substandard residential structures is well above the citywide average (105 structures - 14% are residential buildings). Only 39% of our single family homes are owner-occupied; duplexes represent 42.5%; and our renter population has reached to almost 70%. Resident concern is so great (67%) that according to a neighborhood survey, 66% plan to reside in Sheridan for only three years or less.

  

These factors, in conjunction with other rapidly changing areas (age composition, business development, etc.), have affected the stability of our community. Therefore, a critical need for a grassroots effort exists in Sheridan. It is the desire of our residents that we seek to improve the quality of our community; that we seek to provide consistent and effective leadership, as we work toward a cohesive community. It is our aim then, to begin to address these factors within the scope of our action plan.

 

 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Sheridan neighborhood is requesting $2 million in Neighborhood Revitalization Program funds to assist with implementation of its Full Action Plan. Sheridan's comprehensive plan is reflective of the key concerns and aspirations relative of the entire community, and encompasses the determination of its residents working together to improve neighborhood livability. Their efforts have resulted in the following components:

 

 HOUSING

As a neighborhood coming to terms with the effects of its transitional housing stock, it was determined that quality, affordable housing must be established. To accomplish this priority, innovative programs have been developed that will 1) increase homeownership, 2) encourage property repair/improvements, 3) provide for duplex conversions, and 4) demolish substandard properties.

 

 CRIME and SAFETY

Providing neighborhood safety within a livable environment is of utmost importance to Sheridan residents. The neighborhood crime prevention task force has developed strategies that will include organizing block clubs, improving police services, and making safety related home improvements.

 

 YOUTH

Sheridan believes in its young people and is committed to providing support services that will ensure their future well-being. To achieve this goal, collaborative partnerships have been created to develop recreational, enrichment, and employment opportunities.

 

 BUSINESS

As Sheridan seeks to stabilize its housing stock, and increase its livability factors, addressing its commitment to neighborhood businesses is viewed as integral to the revitalization process. By choosing to invest in our local businesses, while working to preserve the historical character of the area, it is our intent to return our community to a thriving commercial sector.

 

 

Sheridan Neighborhood NRP Plan

Housing

Vision: By creating programs that shall serve to encourage and stimulate private investments by existing and would-be property owners, Sheridan hopes to improve its housing stock, and thus make a contribution toward increasing the stability and livability of its neighborhood.

 

Goal 1: Establish a comprehensive housing improvement program for the neighborhood

Objective A: Sheridan will work with Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to develop loan/grant guidelines and programs.

 

Strategy 1: Contract with Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to administer Sheridan's single and multifamily housing programs.

Resources: $90,000 in NRP Funds: $30,000 (1998)

$30,000 (1999)

$30,000 (2000)

Partners: Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2000

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

Goal 2: Improve existing housing in the Sheridan neighborhood.

Objective A: Provide financial assistance to help homeowners make improvements.

Strategy 1: STAY will work with the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to implement the Fix and Paint Deferred Loan/Grant Program. Fix and Paint is an exterior home improvement program that will provide a maximum of $5,000 to owner-occupants of single-family, duplex, tri-plex, or four-plex residential properties with a one-to-one match of participant funds. Reimbursement requests of $1,500 or less will be disbursed as grants; requests greater than $1,500 will be disbursed as deferred loans. All deferred loan recipients will be required to perform 100 hours of volunteer work and live in the property for a period of six years. Grant or deferred loan recipients may receive a total of not more than $10,000 in NRP grants or deferred loans, including funds received from the 1993-1995 NRP Transition Funds. There are no minimum or maximum income limits.

Resources: $225,000 in NRP Funds: $75,000 (1998)

$75,000 (2000)

$75,000 (2002)

Partners: Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2002

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

 

Note: in 2003, SNO added $300,000 to this program to fund it for 2003, 2004 and 2005.

Strategy 2: STAY will work with the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to implement the Owner-Occupied Revolving Loan Program. The owner-occupant revolving loan program is an interior/exterior home improvement program that will provide a maximum of $10,000 in low-interest loans to single-family, duplex, tri-plex, and four-plex residential property owner-occupants. There is no minimum or maximum income limit for participants.

Resources: $200,000 in NRP Funds: $100,000 (1998)

$100,000 (1999)

Partners: Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 1999

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

 

Goal 3: Increase Home Ownership in the Sheridan neighborhood.

Objective A: Provide financial assistance to persons who wish to build a new construction home in the neighborhood.

 

Strategy 1:STAY will work with the Minneapolis Inspections Department and the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to identify blighted, substandard, or "hot spot" properties in order to coordinate their purchase for demolition, and subsequent land participation in the Cop-On-Every Block Program. The maximum cost for acquisition, demolition, and holding costs is $50,000. The real estate will be sold to a City of Minneapolis police officer for a purchase price of $ 1.00 The officer must build a new construction, three bedroom, single family home and live in his/her home as his/her primary residence for six years.

Resources: $346,500 in NRP Funds: $116,500 (1998)

$115,000 (1999)

$1152000 (2000)

Partners:(STAY)

Greater Minneapolis Metro Housing Corp. (GMMHC)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Inspection Department

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2000

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

Note: in 2003 SNO moved the funding from this program to other housing programs.

Objective B: Encourage owner-occupancy of neighborhood single family homes.

Strategy 1: STAY will work with the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to implement the Duplex Conversion Program (DuCon), which helps owner-occupants of duplexes convert their properties into single family homes. A maximum of $5,000 in DuCon funds will be provided to owner occupants with a one-to-one match of participant funds. Reimbursement requests of $1,500 or less will be disbursed as grants; requests greater than $1,500 will be disbursed as deferred loans. All deferred loan recipients will be required to perform 100 hours of volunteer work, and live in the property for a period of six years. Grant or deferred loan recipients may receive a total of not more than $ 1 0,000 in NRP grants or deferred loans, including funds received from the 1993- 1995 NRP Transition Funds. There are no minimum or maximum income limits.

Resources: $50,000 in NRP Funds: $28,000 (1998)

$22,000 (1999)

 

Partners: Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: ??1998 - 1999

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

 

 

Strategy 2: STAY will work with the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to implement the Duplex Purchaser Program, a resource for persons interested in becoming owner-occupants of duplex structures. Any owner-occupant purchaser of duplex residential property within Sheridan may receive a deferred loan up to a maximum of $3,500 for down-payment or closing cost assistance. All deferred loan recipients will be required to perform 100 hours of volunteer work, and live in the property for a period of six years. Grant or deferred loan recipients may receive a total of not more than $10,000 in NRP grants or deferred loans, including funds received from the 1993-1995 NRP Transition Funds. There are no minimum or maximum income limits.

Resources: $120,000 in NRP Funds: $60,000 (1998)

$60,000 (2000)

Partners: Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2000

Contract Manager. MCDA

 

 

Note: in 2003, this strategy 2 was changed to the following and was funded an addition $150,000:

"SNO will work with a non-profit housing developer to implement the Down Payment Assistance program, a resource for persons interested in becoming owner-occupants of single family, duplex, triplex and fourplex properties."

Goal 4: Increase new home construction in the Sheridan neighborhood.

  

Objective A:Acquire and remove substandard or blighted properties.

Strategy 1: STAY will work with the Minneapolis Inspections Department to identify blighted homes/duplexes/rental properties. Funds will be allocated to match City Inspection Department funds for 249 list properties as part of the April 22, 1996 Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Minneapolis and the Neighborhoods of the City for the Hazardous/Boarded Building Program.

Resources: $30,000 in NRP Funds: $30,000 (1998)

 

Partners:Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Minneapolis Inspection Department

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2000

Contract Manager: Minneapolis Inspections Department

  

Strategy 2: STAY will work with the Minneapolis Inspections Department, the MCDA, and the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to identify blighted homes/duplexes/rental properties, and coordinate their purchase and demolition. The maximum costs for acquisition, demolition and holding costs is $50,000. The real estate will be sold for a $1.00 purchase price through a lottery to any person who is willing to build and live in a new construction, three bedroom, single family home as his/her primary residence for a period of six years. There are no minimum or maximum income limits.

Resources: $350,000 in NRP Funds: $120,000 (1998)

$120,000 (1999)

$110,000 (2000)

Partners:Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Inspection Department

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (MCDA)

Timeline: 1998 - 2000

Contract Manager: MCDA

  

Note: in 2003, SNO moved funding out of this program to fund other housing programs.

Goal 5: Improve the condition of neighborhood rental properties.

Objective A: Provide financial incentives for making needed interior/exterior rental property repairs.

Strategy 1: STAY will work with the Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center to implement a low interest loan program for improvement of absentee landlord single family, duplex, tri-plex, and four-plex rental properties. The absentee landlord revolving loan program is an interior/exterior home improvement program that will provide a maximum of $10,000 in low interest loans to absentee owners of residential property within Sheridan. There are no minimum or maximum income limits.

 

 

Resources: $200,000 in NRP Funds: $200,000 (1998)

Partners:Sheridan Today and Yesterday (STAY)

Northeast Home Ownership Resource Center

Minneapolis Community Development Agency (IMCDA)

Timeline: 1998

Contract Manager: MCDA

 

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